Decade of Centenaries Digital Art Exhibition: Voices Today – Artists, Activists and Citizens

Women’s Voices Today – As part of the Online Exhibition a series of interviews were conducted with women living and working in the Grangegorman area

Smashing Times are delighted to create the digital art exhibition Women’s Voices: Then and Now – A Creative Celebration of Women’s Stories from 1916 to 1923 and the new film Courageous Women written and directed by Mary Moynihan and produced by Freda Manweiler and inspired by the stories of Constance Markievicz, Helena Molony, Margaret Skinnider and Hanna Sheehy Skeffington.

The Women’s Voices Then and Now digital art exhibition features research, articles, biographies and photographs. This exhibition takes inspiration from women’s stories from the 1916 to 1923 period in Irish history, highlighting stories of change experienced by pioneering women in Ireland. We explore women’s stories covering the Irish Rising of 1916, the 1918 Centenary Vote for Women, the Civil War, War of Independence and the founding years of the Irish Free State. We also highlight the voices of artists and citizens as they reflect on the decade of centenaries taking place in Ireland.

As part of the exhibition, we are delighted to feature (see below) interviews with women working and living in the Grangegorman area of Dublin along with 100 statements from members of the public, both men and women, from the Grangegorman area. The interviews and statements are a reflection by people today on the theme of the centenary celebration of votes for women and exploring what the vote means today.

The five interviews and statements below were gathered as part of the project titled Smashing Times: A Creative Celebration of the Centenary Vote for Women which uses creative processes of theatre, film and online digital resources to celebrate the centenary vote for women and to reflect on the experiences of women today in relation to gender equality, human rights and diversity. The partners are St Paul’s CBS Secondary School; Stanhope Street Secondary School; HACE, Henrietta Adult and Community Education and Mount Temple Comprehensive School. The project is supported by ‘ . . . the lives we live’ Grangegorman Public Art; the Grangegorman Development Agency; Dublin City Council; and the Creative Ireland Dublin City Programme 2018 and Dublin City Public Library Archive. The Creative Ireland programme is an all-of-Government five-year initiative from 2017 to 2022, which places creativity at the centre of public policy.

Women’s Stories Today – As part of the Online Exhibition a series of interviews were conducted with women living and working in the Grangegorman area of Dublin, where Smashing Times are based.

The following women were interviewed:

  • Cllr Janice Boylan, local area representative. Sinn Féin Councillor for Dublin North East Inner City Area
  • Fiona Maxwell, local resident, living and working in the Grangegorman area of Dublin
  • Lindsey Melia, local resident, living and working in the Grangegorman area of Dublin
  • Aoife Moran, local resident in the Grangegorman area of Dublin
  • Siphiwe Moyo, local resident in the Grangegorman area of Dublin
  • Valerie Roe, Secondary School Teacher, St Paul’s Secondary School, North Brunswick Street, Dublin 7

Interview with Cllr Janice Boylan, local area representative

The suffragettes campaigned in 1918 for a woman’s right to vote, what does the vote mean for you today in 2018?

Having the right to vote today is so important to me. I couldn’t wait until I was 18 to be able to vote. The suffragettes campaigned and won every woman the right to vote all those years ago, it is immensely important that all women and everyone else go out and cast their democratic right to vote.

Is it important today to remember and have strong, historical female role models?

I believe that it is very important to remember and have historical female role models. They are our past but they forged the way and gave us the chance for a better future.

Identify a hero of yours from the past who inspires you and your hero from today? Tell us about who they are and why they inspire you?

Constance Markievicz is my hero from the past. She was a revolutionary who wasn’t afraid to take the stand needed at the time, which was an armed revolution. She was practical, brave, strong minded and kind. All of the traits that I hold in high regard. My hero from today is Mary Lou McDonald, she stands up for the people that are most forgotten about in society. She herself is practical, brave strong minded and kind as well. Mary Lou has managed to do what many woman still can’t she is the leader of a political party. The only female leader of a political party in the country. She is not afraid to take the stand that is needed.

What change are you involved in or creating today either in your work or personal life or have you experienced in your area and/or in wider society?

I am a local councillor and I truly believe the work that I am doing today is making a big difference. I actively campaigned for and secured housing when the site wasn’t even going to be developed. I hold weekly advice clinics for those who need my assistance. The change I am involved in is bringing our working class communities forward, assisting them but helping them to help themselves. Encouraging them to use their democratic right to vote. A vote for change. 

What can we do today to promote women’s rights and equality for Ireland?

Continue on the path we are already on, many woman have paved the way forward for us. We need to keep highlighting the differences and call out inequality at all stages and at all levels. 

What kind of change do you want to see in the Grangegorman area of Dublin today?

I want to see a thriving college campus, that caters for the needs of the locals as well. I want children in the area to be able to strive to end up going to the college knowing that they can and they have the right to that place. I want to see the grounds used to the full capacity by the locals in a respectful way. I want local football teams to be given the opportunity to use the pitches.

What kind of Ireland do you want for the future?

A united Ireland based on equality for all our citizens north and south. An Ireland of opportunity, an Ireland where no child goes hungry or spends their childhood in a hotel room. An Ireland with one health system a better one, better infrastructure, more job opportunities and more educational opportunities. 

What kind of Europe do you want for the future?

A peaceful one, a Europe that opens its doors to those in need. A Europe that listens to the wishes of the people, because sometimes the government can get it wrong. I would see Europe as a big brother to Ireland but not its over ruling boss. 

Do you support the idea of a centre for the Arts and Human Rights and what can we do to promote access to the arts for all and support for using the arts to promote human rights for all?

Of course I support a centre for arts and human rights. It is something that I think would be very beneficial to the area. I imagine it would open its doors to everyone across society and in turn offer some much needed knowledge and experiences to those people. Sometimes people in working class communities can be a bit hesitant about the arts. I think this is because they don’t know enough about art and how it can be used to promote a range of issues that ultimately would relate to them. I think this idea is a great one.

Interview with Fiona Maxwell, local resident, living and working in the area

The suffragettes campaigned in 1918 for a woman’s right to vote, what does the vote mean for you today in 2018?

Approaching my 18th birthday was an important time; I was looking forward to participating and to exercising my right to vote. I don’t think that women should take a back seat, we are here and part of society and we should not be invisible.

At that time my say and what I wanted to say in my country was very important to me, however now I’m not so sure that our vote counts as much. I feel that the government overrides our vote and does what they want. My engagement with local TD’s has however been very positive in the past, particularly when it came to securing housing. I am therefore somewhat less inclined to vote in General Elections, but I would vote in Referendums and Presidential Elections as I find those more engaging to vote in.

I would also vote in the Local elections, this is predominantly due to my own experiences with local representatives as it has been my personal experience that with a push from them you will get more done. The vote is important but I still believe there are many problems. The Abortion referendum passed and yet a woman was still refused an abortion. For me this still shows that a problem persists with the electoral process.

Is it important today to remember and have strong, historical female role models?

As a mother of three children aged 24, 19, and 14, I think that it is really important to have role models, however in some ways young people today don’t take much interest in past politicians or even past presidents. I have often overheard people saying ‘she’s a woman she shouldn’t be there’, from both men and women on more than one occasion.

Identify a hero of yours from the past who inspires you and your hero from today? Tell us about who they are and why they inspire you?

I have huge admiration and respect for Mary McAleese. I believe she did significant work in promoting peace and reconciliation. She was and is an excellent role model, someone who stood her ground and wasn’t afraid to be heard.

I believe that President Higgins is the best president we have ever had. He has brought people together and he is a voice that represents so many of us. I am always happy to see him represent our country.

Within my local area I really admire the work of Brother Kevin, in the Capuchin Day Centre for the Homeless. He does fantastic work and I always try to support him and the work he does.

What change are you involved in or creating today either in your work or personal life or have you experienced in your area and / or in wider society?

I think it can be really hard to bring people together to effect change; it’s the same people all the time. People don’t do enough to affect change. Politics even at societal level can be challenging.

What can we do today to promote women’s rights and equality for Ireland?

I think there should be equal pay for both men and women who are doing the same job. Women need to encourage and support women more; women are scared to stand up and talk about their feelings, because people call them out on it and tell them they can’t do the same things as men because ‘you’re only a woman’.

What kind of change do you want to see in the Grangegorman area of Dublin today?

Within the Grangegorman and Cabra areas, most community clubs are in Cabra. We need more summer clubs and youth clubs. I would love to see a Public Swimming Pools and a Public Tennis Court. This would keep young people occupied and engaged. Bullying is a huge problem for young people and more social and youth related activities would really help in addressing this.

What kind of Ireland do you want for the future?

A united Ireland is not something I aspire to, after decades of conflict peace is peace and we should be able to manage the situation as we have been over recent years since the signing of the Good Friday agreement. There will be conflict if we try to change this. Identity is important and we cannot impose our identity on someone else.

I would also like to see us work together to look after the environment and to have less waste. We also need better communications in hospitals with doctors, nurses and patients, and more beds and less waiting times

What kind of Europe do you want for the future?

I like the concept of the European Union, but in some ways they are sitting back and we are doing the work; we are a little country but we are strong little country. We know what we want but our government won’t give it to us. How then would the EU give it to us? We need fairness and equality all around, but that starts locally, nationally and then at European Level.

Do you support the idea of a centre for the Arts and Human Rights and what can we do to promote access to the arts for all and support for using the arts to promote human rights for all?

I completely support the idea of a Centre for the Arts and Human Rights; especially for children and young people. Arts, Crafts, Theatre, Film, Dance Festivals, the list goes on but essentially the arts engages communities and brings people together equally.

What has been your experience of being asked to participate in this project? How did the find the process; did it empower you, make you reflect on the centenary vote and on your role in society?

It was lovely to be asked and to be included. It made me think about things that should be in the area and amenities that we don’t have. It would be really good for the new Campus to send the local residents more information about what is available on the campus and allowing locals to access these services.

Interview with Lindsey Melia, local resident, living and working in the area

The suffragettes campaigned in 1918 for a woman’s right to vote, what does the vote mean for you today in 2018?

For me the vote today is important as it means that we all have a voice and we are heard equally and individually.

Is it important today to remember and have strong, historical female role models?

I believe it is important to remember and recognise strong historical female role models as they have helped to pave the path for the changes that have already occurred and the possibility of enhancing these.

Identify a hero of yours from the past who inspires you and your hero from today? Tell us about who they are and why they inspire you?

My past hero is my mother. I believe she was a strong woman, despite being one of seventeen children and living a humble life. She had little education yet worked hard to ensure her family were well provided for and taken care of. No matter what happened in life she always continued to smile, and while she suffered losses and tough times she still made sure her family were always happy and never gave up trying.

My hero of today is my sister. Despite having three children and one having special needs, she still continues to advance her career and work hard. She is a caring and inspirational person who is always there for everyone and is a tower of strength for all the family. If she believes in something she will firmly stand her ground.

What change are you involved in or creating today either in your work or personal life or have you experienced in your area and/or in wider society?

The biggest change for me would be within my personal/work life. Over the last few years I have had the courage and motivation to get a job, and further my education which has allowed me to further my career. I now have a confidence both in myself and in the role I play, not only on a personal level but within the work and academic environment.

What can we do today to promote women’s rights and equality for Ireland?

A number of things we can do is to join groups promoting rights and partaking in social media campaigns. We can also assist in any campaigns and ensure that the younger generation are aware not only of their right to a voice but the knowledge of how things were 100 years ago so they realise the importance of speaking out. However, I believe the main thing to do is to ensure we always use our vote as every vote counts.

What kind of change do you want to see in the Grangegorman area of Dublin today?

It would be nice to see a bigger development in community activities for people of all ages, ensuring children have activity time and not just ‘technology time’. It would also be good to see more activities for elderly people with little or no family to ensure inclusion within the community.

What kind of Ireland do you want for the future?

I would like to see Ireland working together to ensure a better future for everyone, being able to leave past differences behind and have a friendlier positive outlook

What kind of Europe do you want for the future?

It would be nice to see Europe working together with all members of the E.U. and all supporting each other in growth and development.

Do you support the idea for a centre for the Arts and Human Rights and what can we do to promote access to the arts for all and support for using the arts to promote human rights for all?

Yes, I believe it would be beneficial for all members of the community to have a centre as it would help develop and enhance knowledge of human rights. The promotion of access to arts can be mainly done through social media as it has such a huge impact on today’s generation and can also cause awareness to be spread by word of mouth.

What has been your experience of being asked to participate in this project? How did the find the process; did it empower you, make you reflect on the centenary vote and on your role in society?

My experience participating in this project has being amazing. Niamh has made it a joy to be a part of. Taking part did make me think about women’s right to vote in a way I probably never would have before.

I have always thought that that we are lucky that times have changed and women of today have our voice. But I had never actually looked into how big that was until this project came up. So for that alone I’m thankful for being asked to take part in it. 

Interview with Aoife Moran, local resident

The suffragettes campaigned in 1918 for a woman’s right to vote, what does the vote mean for you today in 2018?

My right to vote, as a woman, is hugely important to me and a privilege that I am certainly grateful for. I am extremely grateful that I have the opportunity to be an active participant in our democratic system. This was particularly the case in more recent times when there were legislative decisions being put to the public that directly impact the women of Ireland. Whenever I vote (and I always do) I feel an enormous sense of pride that I have this right. I tend to be very private about my political views on social media but will always share that I have voted because I think our freedom to vote in a genuinely free way is not to be taken for granted and a privilege that many people, men and women, sadly still don’t enjoy in the world today.

Is it important today to remember and have strong, historical female role models?

Yes, absolutely. Without remembering our strong historical female role models we can’t hope to foster future role models for women in the future. 

Identify a hero of yours from the past who inspires you and your hero from today? Tell us about who they are and why they inspire you?

My Granddad is a hero of mine. Very briefly, for context, a small village very close to where I grew up in Wexford was involved in a pretty big scandal in the 1940/50’s when a protestant woman refused to send her catholic children to the local primary school. This made international press and at the point of its escalation the church ordered a boycott of all protestant businesses and services in the area. 

A local protestant farmer who had been very generous and helpful to my mother’s family died during this boycott. My grandfather, who by all accounts was a God fearing man and a ‘good catholic’ like most people back then, defied the church and broke the boycott to pay his respects to this neighbour without so much as a second thought. We knew this story growing up and it always left me with an enormous sense of pride in what he did and with such an important value to live your life by. 

Hopefully this isn’t clichéd but my hero from today is my Mother. Her life growing up was so different to mine and to anything I can really relate to (she remembers rural electrification and when her parents managed a farm without any automated machinery!). She comes from a line of really strong women and there is a drive that has been passed down through the generations that has seen my sisters and I open ourselves up to opportunities that I know lots of our peers wouldn’t/didn’t. 

When we were growing up I see now that her drive was to encourage us to be independent, she especially didn’t want any of us to become dependent on a man, and to follow our own paths in life. At the same time she instilled a fierce sense of loyalty in us and I am very grateful for that. 

What can we do today to promote women’s rights and equality for Ireland?

I think we have come a long way in terms of equal rights for women, particularly in recent times. I would like to see more women involved in politics at a senior level, and more female business leaders, though not appointed just for the sake of meeting targets/optics. 

What kind of change do you want to see in the Grangegorman area of Dublin today?

Again, we are experiencing lots of really positive change in the Grangegorman area at the moment, particularly with the development of the DIT (TUD?) campus. As someone who lives in the area I am delighted to see this but think that it’s really important that we also remember the not so nice parts of Grangegorman’s history and in particular the women that suffered there until relatively recent times.

What kind of Ireland do you want for the future?

At the moment my biggest hope is that we have an Ireland that is politically stable across both sides of our boarders and that we don’t return to the levels of violence that were experienced in the 70’s because of Brexit.

What kind of Europe do you want for the future?

Again, I would like to see a politically stable EU. At the moment there are dangerous narratives creeping in amongst certain EU Countries that are threatening the stability of the Union. Much of this is built on narratives around migrants and refugees that is unsettling. I would like to see strong leadership coming out against this.

Do you support the idea of a centre for the Arts and Human Rights and what can we do to promote access to the arts for all and support for using the arts to promote human rights for all?

 Yes I absolutely support the idea of a centre for the Arts and Human Rights.

What has been your experience of being asked to participate in this project? How did the find the process; did it empower you, make you reflect on the centenary vote and on your role in society?

I feel honoured to have been asked to participate in this project and was delighted to take part. Being asked to participate certainly did get me thinking about the role of women in today’s society, how far we have come in the last 100 years, and the part I play within that. As the mother of a small son, it also prompted me to seriously reflect on the impact my words and actions will have on him in how he views and treats women in the future. For me, I see it as one of my greatest responsibilities is to be a good role model for him (in every way I can of course) but particularly in making sure he grows up respecting women and viewing them as equal and valuable members of society.

Interview with Siphiwe Mayo, local resident

The suffragettes campaigned in 1918 for a woman’s right to vote, what does the vote mean for you today in 2018?

It is important to vote and give your voice when you reach voting age. In Zimbabwe where I grew up the legal age to vote is also 18. However a lot of people wouldn’t vote there because nothing changes, things stay the same. I look forward to being able to vote in Ireland and to have my voice heard in the future.

Is it important today to remember and have strong, historical female role models?

Yes!!! I love to know where I come from and to celebrate each and every person that helped me along the way, especially when it comes to freedom. Our future is linked to where we come from; this is something I feel very passionate about.

Identify a hero of yours from the past who inspires you and your hero from today? Tell us about who they are and why they inspire you?

My past hero is my mother. She was physically disabled but it was never a barrier to her, she went through a lot but she built resilience in me – telling me ‘you are here you need to go forward, as long as you have breath in you, you keep going’. If you are strong, you raise someone to be stronger. You lead by example. My mother did this for me all of her life.

What change are you involved in or creating today either in your work or personal life or have you experienced in your area and / or in wider society?

For me theatre has really helped me express myself and live. Change of Address Theatre really helped me when I was in Direct Provision. I love celebrating culture and where I come from fusing the culture with performance. This is something I would like to be more involved in.

What can we do today to promote women’s rights and equality for Ireland?

For me I think the mediums of Theatre and Drama can be really useful tools in the promotion of women’s rights and equality. We don’t always see it as a big voice but for me drama is powerful. You can portray your story in film and theatre. I feel I can portray my story in a comfortable environment. For me theatre and drama bring people together in a community.

What kind of change do you want to see in the Grangegorman area of Dublin today?

It is a new area for me, so I would love to see a Community Centre. I don’t know many people and for me it is a way to get to know people and share cultures.

What kind of Ireland do you want for the future?

I would like to see minority groups and culture coming together and celebrating identities. I think this will lead a more inclusive society for everyone.

What kind of Europe do you want for the future?

If we all accept each other everything will be better.

Do you support the idea of a centre for the Arts and Human Rights and what can we do to promote access to the arts for all and support for using the arts to promote human rights for all?

100%. Both spaces are important and bringing them together is a fantastic idea that I would support very much.

What has been your experience of being asked to participate in this project? How did the find the process; did it empower you, make you reflect on the centenary vote and on your role in society?

I have loved the process and the opportunity to have my voice heard in this way.

Interview with Valerie Roe, Secondary School Teacher, St Paul’s School, North Brunswick Street

The suffragettes campaigned in 1918 for a woman’s right to vote, what does the vote mean for you today in 2018?

The vote means that all people are equal. Every time I have been able to vote I have, except for the 2nd Lisbon Treaty because I was in hospital having just given birth. I think there’s a great injustice to those who are in hospital and not able to participate in elections or referendums and I didn’t think about it until I was in that situation myself.

There’s an interesting situation in considering the suffragettes campaign for women to vote and then women who have just given birth not being able to.

Is it important today to remember and have strong, historical female role models?

It is. Although I would argue that it is equally as important to have male role models. Men and Women need both male and female role models.
I think it can be harder to find female role models in history but I do think that is changing.

Identify a hero of yours from the past who inspires you and your hero from today? Tell us about who they are and why they inspire you?

A past role model is Rosa Parks; to me one simple act became something that was so much bigger.

My heroes from today are the women in the Cervical Smear Campaign; their bravery and strength is amazing, particularly how many are giving their precious time for other people so that other women will not find themselves in the same situation ever again. They are fighting for others, so that no one will have to go through what they are.

What change are you involved in or creating today either in your work or personal life or have you experienced in your area and / or in wider society?

I have seen a lot of change in the school I work in in the past twenty-two years. When I first started working there, there were only 5 female teachers, and this has changed so much.

I firmly believe that change happens with quiet revolutions. Respect is earned and so it should be. We cannot expect something because we are woman or a man.

What can we do today to promote women’s rights and equality for Ireland?

I don’t like the term women’s rights. I believe it should just be everyone’s rights. I don’t like the divide and conquer approach. For example I don’t think you should get promoted just because you are a woman. Again it is about respect.

What kind of change do you want to see in the Grangegorman area of Dublin today?

More facilities for children and young people. More open spaces and a sports hall in our school would be great!

What kind of Ireland and Europe do you want for the future?

I don’t like change for changes sake. In Ireland we say something is wrong and then we get rid of everything. My take is good riddance to the bad and let’s keep the good. Take the Catholic Church for example. There seems to be this movement that we should just completely demolish the entire institution, however getting rid of religion is not the answer; the church and religion have created communities, a sense of belonging and community spirit over generations. This is not just within the Catholic faith but all faiths. I believe that acceptance and understanding happens by learning together. This new tolerance we purport to have may in fact be the most intolerant of all.

Do you support the idea of a centre for the Arts and Human Rights and what can we do to promote access to the arts for all and support for using the arts to promote human rights for all?

Completely. The arts provide people with the opportunity to express themselves in ways that other areas don’t.

What has been your experience of being asked to participate in this project? How did the find the process; did it empower you, make you reflect on the centenary vote and on your role in society?

I wouldn’t have had this conversation with others, but all of the questions are things I do think about. For me the female struggle is gone from my workplace and as I said I don’t like the term women’s rights. I believe it should just be everyone’s rights.

Statements Gathered from People Living in the Grangegorman Area of Dublin reflecting on the theme of Votes for Women and what the vote means today

Votes for Women and what the vote means today:

‘Empowerment and knowing that all people’s values, all people’s views, thoughts and ideas are important and honouring those brave and strong women who persisted so that our voices will always be heard, expressed and respected. Always use your vote.’ Niamh O’Brien Rhiannon

‘It means that I can have a say in determining my own future.’ Karla McBride

‘For me the vote today is important as it means that we all have a voice and we are heard equally and individually rather than a woman being hidden behind her husband. I also believe it is important to remember and recognise strong historical female role models as they have helped to pave the path for the changes that have already occurred and the possibility of enhancing these going forward in the next 100 years.’ Lindsey Melia

‘A chance for my voice to be heard in a male dominating country, it’s my responsibility to use it out of respect for the women before me that fought for it.’ Kelly Fitzsimons

‘Being able to vote means that my voice is being heard and I can take part in changes in society.’ Sue Nelson

‘For me, it is not only a reflection of the power of women in modern society but also of how far we have come. Winning the right to vote was pivotal in kick starting the movement of women’s rights, a movement that has spanned over a whole century and paved the way for women to stand as equals with men. Not only that, but we live in a country today that gives us very little control over what happens, over what decisions are made for us. There is little or nothing we can do about them but every now and again, the opportunity arises for us to have our say, to raise our voices for what we believe in. So what does the vote mean for me today? It means that the women who fought for it all those years ago, gave a voice, not only to themselves but for generations of women to follow. It is a reminder of how far we have come and of how far we have yet to go.’ Amy Jordan

‘Essential for equality to allow women to vote. We can have a different perspective and an important perspective.’

‘Women who reach voting age in 2019 may not feel inherently inferior to men as their relatives did 100 years ago, we are breaking the cycle of ingrained inequality.’

‘Voting is part of being a citizen of this country. As a citizen, I am proud to be a voter and an equal part of our society.’

‘Voices make things change.’

‘People in power should be aware and empathetic toward those who have less power. People who have had their rights taken away should stand up and fight to regain them.’

‘I think it’s important to vote because people get the chance to change things.’

‘A greater engagement and a deeper understanding of civil society around the importance of the vote and an understanding of what it means.’ Freda

‘Ongoing recognition of the brave men and women who fought for greater democratic engagement form all levels of society through the process of voting.’ Billy

‘Gender equality is a very important role in my life because I am a woman I want to be able to enjoy doing the same job as men and voting the same.’ Larissa

‘The age for voting should be changed to 16.’ Mandy

‘Gender equality is very important. We are all human and we all should be treated equally. You shouldn’t shame anyone because of their gender.’ Seanin

‘In my opinion gender equality is normal; it’s okay for a boy to grow up and realise he wants to be a girl and it’s okay for a girl to grow up and become a boy. I think voting should be changed to 16 and not 18.’ Halle Mumbley

‘The age to vote should be 16 because people at that age are looking out for their future.’ Kerry

‘Gender equality is very important, it was very unfair for women in Ireland in the past.’ Shianne

‘Everyone should be equal. Women in the older times were not recognised in the same way as men and had no rights. This is not fair to have higher of lower status.’ Angeleena Antony

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